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Wilcox and White

The History of Wilcox and White Organs

The Wilcox and White Company was established in 1877 by Horace Wilcox and Henry White. The company’s factory was located in Meriden, Connecticut, and its offices were located in New York City. Wilcox and White was very much a family business, with Henry White’s sons and grandsons playing vital roles in the company’s success and development. [1] 


Known for the Angelus Grand and the Artrio-Angelus reproducing mechanism for player orch pianos, this enterprising company manufactured a wide array of both reproducing orch pianos, and organs. [2] Interestingly enough, Wilcox and White landed on the name “Angelus”, after a popular painting by the same name was in and out of the news for its hefty price tag. In an ingenious marketing move, the company was able to capitalize on the opulence that the painting “Angelus” evoked, and apply it towards their instruments of the same name. The company even went so far as to use a version of the painting as their trademark logo. [3]


Wilcox and White produced instruments until the early nineteen-twenties, at which time they close their doors. [4]

About Wilcox and White Organs

Wilcox and White’s self-playing orchestral pianos and organs were quality instruments that were quite popular during their day. The company produced instruments that were ahead of their time in complexity, at a moment in history when musicians were very attracted to the latest and greatest. With beautiful casings and soft but powerful tone, Wilcox and White instruments were highly regarded by musicians in the United States. [5]


Restoring a Wilcox and White Organs

Many Wilcox and White instruments that are still around today are quite old, which leaves very few specimens that are in any condition to be restored. Because of their rarity, a fully restored Wilcox and White organ can fetch as much as $18,000. Worthwhile restoration of one of these instruments largely depends on its condition. Contact Lindeblad to find out whether restoring your Wilcox and White instrument would be a worthwhile endeavor. 

References: 

[1] http://www.pianola.org/factsheets/angelus.cfm

[2] Pierce, W. Robert. Pierce Piano Atlas: Anniversary Edition, 2017 Our 70th Year. Albuquerque: Ashley, 2017. Print.

[3] http://www.pianola.org/factsheets/angelus.cfm

[4] Pierce, W. Robert. Pierce Piano Atlas: Anniversary Edition, 2017 Our 70th Year. Albuquerque: Ashley, 2017. Print.

[5] http://www.pianola.org/factsheets/angelus.cfm

Images: 

http://www.pianola.org/factsheets/angelus.cfm